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    Am J Hypertens. 2011 Nov;24(11):1234-8. doi: 10.1038/ajh.2011.132. Epub 2011 Sep 8.

    Augmentation index association with reactive hyperemia as assessed by peripheral arterial tonometry in hypertension.

    Source

    Division of Cardiology, Severance Cardiovascular Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:

    Augmentation pressure has emerged as a surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease, and endothelial dysfunction has been proposed as related factor. However, the relationship between augmentation pressure and digital endothelial function has not yet been well defined. We investigated the relationship between augmentation pressure and digital reactive hyperemia (RH) in patients with hypertension using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT), which is regarded as being representative of endothelial function.

    METHODS:

    One hundred hypertensive patients (64 males; mean age, 49 ± 12 years) without a history of taking antihypertensive medication were enrolled in this study.

    RESULTS:

    The mean augmentation pressure and augmentation index (AIx) normalized for a heart rate of 75 beats/min (AIx75) were 15 ± 8 mm Hg and 26 ± 11%, respectively. The mean RH-PAT index and log transformed PAT ratio were 2.24 ± 0.55 and 0.62 ± 0.30. There was an inverse relationship between the RH-PAT index and age, male sex, and body mass index. The log transformed PAT ratio also showed inverse relationship with age and male sex. The RH-PAT index and the log transformed PAT ratio showed no relationship with augmentation pressure or AIx75. In a multiple linear regression analysis, age, height, and central systolic BP demonstrated an independent association with augmentation pressure and AIx75.

    CONCLUSION:

    In patients with hypertension, the RH-PAT index determined using PAT was not associated with augmentation pressure or AIx75. Digital vascular function may be a less important factor for pressure augmentation in patients with hypertension.

    PMID:
    21901014
    [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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